Seeing Jerusalem through the eyes of its visitors

I was fortunate enough to attend the Travel Blogger Exchange (TBEX) International conference in Jerusalem last week, which is pretty much a conference for professional travelers.

Many of the 400 attendees manage to make a living out of writing about their travels. The sessions I attended included tips on how to monetize your blog, appeal to sponsors and improve your content to generate more followers.

Click here for the PDF of the full article in The Jerusalem Post.

The full article on The Jerusalem Post website is for subscribers only but it can be read by non-subscribers on a mobile device with this link.

Uzi Eli Etrog Man(Credit Noam Moskowitz)

Uzi Eli Etrog Man(Credit Noam Moskowitz)

Travel bloggers of the world descend on Jerusalem

I am thrilled to be attending TBEX International 2017 next week at ICC Jerusalem (Binyanei Hauma).  This is their first international travel blogger conference and it is exciting that it is happening in Jerusalem.

TBEX events are attended by travel bloggers from all over the world and I am particularly interested to meet those who have never been to Israel before and hear their thoughts.

As well as the opportunity to network with other bloggers, photographers and podcasters, the program has lots of interesting talks about content, monetization, sponsorship and driving traffic to your site.

If you plan to attend but still don’t have tickets, you can using the discount code ISRAEL ($95 for whole conference instead of $197) http://tbexcon.com/2017-International/registration/ and please add a comment below if you will be attending so we can meet up!

Here is a video with the interviews from some of the TBEX key bloggers when visited Jerusalem last year in preparation for the conference.

 

Idyllic country café in the Hula Valley

As I have mentioned in other posts, I like to do research before I travel to make sure that I know about all the hidden foodie gems that I would never find otherwise.  This is one time when that research really paid off. Having been in the Hula Valley area before, I knew there were not many exciting options for lunch, especially with my parents who only eat kosher.

We had spent the morning at Agamon Hula (read my post How the Hula valley made me a bird watcher) and had built up quite an appetite. My father was insistent that we try the new Hotel Galilion as who can go wrong in a nice hotel but we were told very rudely that there were no dining options unless we were hotel guests or pre-booked. It turns out that this was very fortunate for us, as otherwise we would never have found my back-up option Beit Ha’ugot. I don’t remember how I heard about Beit Ha’ugot but I am pretty sure it was from a Facebook group.

It was already nearly 2pm so I called to check that they were open and the very nice owner said that she would keep the kitchen open if we arrived in the next 15 minutes.  One of my favorite things about these obscure places is the anticipation of not knowing what you are going to find.  I wasn’t sure if had the right address but the moshav was fairly small and we followed numerous signs, weaving our way through a small residential neighborhood until we eventually found the oasis that is Beit Ha’ugot.  Set in the lovely garden of a family home, I don’t think any description I give will really do it justice.

We were lucky that it was warm enough in late February to sit outside on the wooden decking, surrounded by various citrus trees.  The back of the garden, which backs onto various fruit orchards, is lined with a number of cages filled with chickens, guinea fowl and various brightly colored budgies.  Here is a Facebook live video I shot from the garden – sorry it is a so blurry.

My mother and I both ordered the quinoa salad which was served with finely chopped vegetables and garnished with seeds.  My father opted to the shakshuka which he said was the best he has ever had and we all enjoyed the freshly baked wholegrain bread with tahina and home-made garlic butter.  The cakes all looked amazing but we resisted but I had a lovely jam biscuit with my macchiato and I regret not buying some of the biscuits and cakes to take home with us.

If the café wasn’t closing, we would happily have spent the afternoon relaxing in the sun in such tranquil surroundings. The owner was delightful and was so happy that we had stumbled on her cafe. The couple at the table next to us had come from Tiveria especially for lunch.

Considering the lack of good dairy restaurants in the area, I am not surprised this place is so popular. In case it is not clear, I would highly recommend a visit to Beit Ha’ugot and it is even worth a special trip – next time I plan to order the full Israeli breakfast as it looks great.

Beit Ha’ugot, Kosher Mehadrin, 052-651-0881 – call in advance to check timings.

Foodie score 8.5/10 FODMAP 8/10

How the Hula Valley made me a bird watcher

Growing up in London, I was fortunate to live close to a country park which meant that many different species of birds would occasionally land in our garden.  I have no clue about names of species, I just appreciate beauty. However, the Hula Valley is a whole different ball game.

It seems that many local Israelis do not know that Israel is a major stopover for birds migrating between Europe and Africa and most stopover in the Hula Valley.  The climate and terrain of the Hula Valley make it particularly attractive to water birds.  The area was originally marsh land but was drained in the 1950s to combat problems with malaria. This led to the establishment of Israel’s first nature reserve.  During the migrations seasons, 500 million birds from 400 species migrate in the skies above and thousands remain during the winter and nest in spring and summer.

This was my second visit to the Hula Valley and only at the end of our day there, did we learn that there are actually 2 nature reserves with virtually identical names offering different viewing options and activities.

The first is Agamon Hula which is the one most people know about and the second Hula Nature Reserve, the less known little sister which was about to close by the time we discovered it so I will have to go back again to see what lies inside (last entry at 4pm, closes at 5pm).  Apparently this site is smaller and therefore you can explore it all by foot and it also includes water buffalo, deer and a long covered bridge which allows you to observe the birds directly on the lake. There is also an interactive 3D video which we tried to go and see the next morning but the same rude unhelpful woman from the night before had failed to tell us that the video is only shown in English at certain times so I recommend calling beforehand to get all the details (04-693-7069). Here is a link to a map of the area which shows both sites clearly marked.

Agamon Hula is the larger of the two sites and although you can walk around the reserve yourself (no entry charge), the circuit  is about 8.5 km so it is much easier to get around by hiring bikes or golf carts.  There is also an option to take an organized Safari Wagon tour that takes you into the field where the cranes are fed but we opted to whiz around the park in the golf cart instead. Annoyingly, there is a time limit of 2 hours on the hire of the golf cart, which is not really enough time to see everything, especially when there are lots of other visitors getting in your way.

The walking and bike paths are very well organized and as well as passing various birds and other wildlife along the way,  there are several observation points which allow for optimal viewing of the birds and some have specialist bird watchers with telescopes to help explain what you are seeing.

The first stop was the botanical garden which does not have many birds but is still very pretty to walk around.

The main attraction in the winter months are the 40,000 Common Cranes that spend the winter (choosing to stay in Israel, rather than continuing onto Africa).  The park provides the optimal conditions for the birds and feeds them regularly (eight tons of corn a day) to prevent them from feeding on the crops of in the surrounding fields (more details of the Crane Project here).

In the video below you can see the cranes in the fields and some start to take off to fly to where they are fed.

We were too late in the season to see any White Pelicans who also winter here, but did see plenty of Egrets and various ducks including Moulards (ironic considering my dinner the night before at Ahuzat Dobrovin).

We passed several water rats known as Coypu or Nutria- a cross between a beaver and a rat which roam around the grass banks of the lake.

We were very lucky that it was a beautiful sunny day which definitely made our visit even more enjoyable.  If you are looking to get out of the big smoke and be surrounded by beautiful scenery, then I highly recommend a trip to Agamon Hula.  The fact we could see the snow topped Mount Hermon, from wherever we were, certainly makes for a stunning backdrop.

The most convenient place to stay in the area, is Hotel Galilion which overlooks the park.  The hotel was busy with a large conference that week and the prices were high, so we opted to stay in Nofesh Baharim, a lovely B&B in nearby moshav Ramot Naftaly – (full review here). We did pop into Hotel Galilion to look around.  The hotel is well designed with a lovely pool area but there was a very strong smell of manure wafting from a nearby farm which is not ideal.  We enquired about having lunch (my father has a theory that you cannot go wrong with lunch at a hotel, I don’t agree but sometimes it is easier not to argue) and were greeted by a very snotty nosed receptionist who informed us that the dining room (meat buffet) was for hotel guests and pre-booking only but they would soon be opening Agamon Market which she equated to Sarona Market (in her dreams).

Luckily, I was prepared with an alternative option and we drove 5 minutes to Beit Ha’ugot in Moshav Yesud Hama`Ala which turned out to be one of the highlights of our trip – here is the full review.

Here is post about the first day of our trip Exploring nature with good food along the way.

Ahuzat Dobrovin – fine dining in a farm

I probably use the term hidden gem in reference to restaurants far too often, but in this case it is 100% accurate.  Not only is this kosher meat restaurant hidden in between fields and orchards in a moshava near the Hula Valley, it also seems that many locals do not realize that it actually functions as a restaurant, rather than just a venue for private events.  Hopefully by writing about it, more people can discover this true “hidden gem”.

I previously ate at Ahuzat Dobrovin when I visited the Hula Valley 3 years ago based on a recommendation from a reliable source (thanks Andrew!).  Since then I have recommended to anyone I know who will be in that area.

Dobrovin Farm was one of the first farms in the Hula Valley, established by Andrey Dobrivin who moved to Ottoman Syria with his family in 1903. It functioned as a farm for many years until in 1968 the family donated the estate to the JNF and the farm was converted into a museum to commemorate the early pioneers (next time I plan to actually visit the museum).

The décor in the restaurant fits with the surroundings and the mismatched fixtures and fittings add to the charm of the place.  Although it was a Sunday night, there were a few other tables around us but by the end of the meal, we were the only diners.

For starters I shared a huge portion of Smoked Asian-Style Wings (NIS 40) which were finger licking good!  I am not normally a fan of smoky wings as the sauce normally comes from a bottle but these were clearly smoked on site with a deliciously sticky sauce that was not too sweet.  My father enjoyed a warm bowl of Orange vegetable soup with the focaccia style house bread.

Much as I love steaks, this time I opted for the Moulard Duck Breast (NIS 95) which was nice and juicy and well flavored but I would have preferred the fat to be slightly more rendered than it was.  My father devoured a Dry-Aged Entrecote (NIS 125 for 300g) and my mother enjoyed the Smoked Asado Beef (NIS 90) with mashed root vegetables and green beans.

Although we only ordered the Chocolate Soufflé (NIS 30) – they brought us a selection of desserts that included the rich, well executed soufflé, deconstructed apple cake and chocolate and peanut truffles.

As you would expect in a country restaurant, they were not so happy with special requests and the service was not as attentive as it could have been.  Unlike some of the meat restaurants in the north, I would not make a special trip just to eat here but if you are nearby, I highly recommend it as the food is very good and the setting is so unique.

If you want to read more about what we got up to in the area, read here about Exploring nature with good food along the way and How the Hula Valley made me a bird watcher.

Ahuzat Dobrovin – Kosher 052-3025154, 04-6934485

FODMAP friendly score 7/10, Foodie score 8/10

Exploring nature with good food along the way

I recently took a 3 day trip in the north of Israel which combined some quality family time, historic sites, beautiful nature and of course some great hidden foodie gems.

When it comes to traveling I am a researcher, especially for restaurants. Although it can be fun to be spontaneous and find somewhere nearby to eat, I have too often been disappointed this way and when you are trying to pack lots of activities into a relatively short time,  I prefer to know in advance what is around and discover new food experiences. However, I will often have a few options to choose from, depending on what we are in the mood for at the time.

We started our trip up north with a quick stop at a Lavido visitor’s center in the agricultural Moshav Nahalal in the Jezreel Valley.  As well as the Lavido factory shop, there is a beautiful herb garden and a peaceful refreshment area where you can make your own tea infusion using the herbs from the garden.

Lavido natural beauty products are now Vegan Friendly and we particularly like the Lavender hand cream and body lotion which is especially nice to put on before bed.  Unfortunately I had an allergic reaction to their award winning eye cream and the sales assistant was not very helpful and tried to blame me for not knowing that I might be allergic to some of the products, but that aside, I recommend a visit.

Time for lunch in nearby Ramat Yishai at a small coffee shop named Eva Batya which was recommended by someone in the Restaurant Club Israel Group.  It is a very simple coffee shop in a strip mall overlooking a parking lot so the setting is very unexciting but I was with people who only eat in kosher places and the choices in that area are very minimal (the products have a hechsher but the coffee shop doesn’t even though everything is dairy and they are closed on Shabbat).  The menu is limited with a few pre-made filled savory croissants, quiches and salads.  The salads were all freshly prepared and the bread that came with it was delicious.  I had the endive salad (NIS 52) with toasted almonds, poached pears, blue cheese and a tangy citrus vinaigrette which I enjoyed. The coffee was also very good and came with a lovely linzer torte cookie. Over all the food was nice, but I would not recommend going unless you only eat kosher as there are much nicer non-kosher places in the area (like Limousine)

Following lunch we drove to Zippori, a national park which contains the remains of an ancient city that was once the capital of the Galilee, the seat of the Sanhedrin, the place where the Mishna was completed and it is also believed to be the home of the parents of Mary and possibly where Mary and Joseph first met.

The park includes Roman, Jewish and Christian buildings and ruins.  It happened to be a beautifully sunny spring day and the site is very spread out so we enjoyed walking around and exploring the various excavations.  We particularly enjoyed the Dionysus House, a Roman villa, containing a mosaic floor describing scenes from the life of Dionysus, god of wine in Greek mythology, as well as several other elaborate and well preserved mosaics.

The city Synagogue dates back to the end of the Byzantine period and also contains an impressive mosaic floor which depicts the Sacrifice of Isaac, the signs of the Zodiac, a description of the Tabernacle in the desert and the Arc of the Covenant in the Jerusalem Temple. The floors have been beautifully restored and the synagogue ruins are housed inside a building to protect the mosaics.

Signs of the Zodiac – Synagogue at Zippori

There are also breathtaking views, especially from the roof of the Crusader Castle that sits on the top of a hill. As the park is large with many interest building, you do need to allow a few hours to see everything, including a very nice introductory video.  As it was still officially winter when we visited the park closed at 4pm (which they failed to mention when we arrived at 2.30pm) so we were rushed at the end to get out before they closed and I could have happily spent more time exploring.

From there we drove to our B&B Nofesh Baharim in Moshav Ramot Naftaly to check in and freshen up, before heading for dinner at Ahuzat Dobrovin.

For those who are interested in visiting wineries, there are several great ones which we passed nearby on our journey but we just didn’t have time on this trip to do everything.  I am mentioning them here as suggestions of alternative itineraries in this area. The Jezreel Valley Winery is close to Zippori and the Netofa Winery is about 30 minutes away, on the road up  to the Hula Valley.

Here is post about the second day of our trip in the Hula Valley – How the Hula Valley made me a bird watcher.

Kosher Musings in The Judean Hills

Day or night, Muza Bahar is a scenic way to enjoy a very good meal.

While I love the convenience of going to eat locally, sometimes it is fun to escape the city, appreciate the countryside and enjoy the theater of a meal with a view. Muza Bahar in Moshav Shoresh is an ideal restaurant for such occasions.

The restaurant opened three years ago and became a popular destination for people in Tel Aviv and the center of the country on Shabbat. A year ago, owners Yifat and Yaron Armoza decided they wanted to have their weekends back and that they preferred to cater to the kosher market. Much of the menu has remained the same, and some of their customers have remained loyal and are amazed at how well the menu has adapted to the kosher diet, especially the desserts. All the food is freshly prepared on the premises with no preservatives – the focus is on highquality raw ingredients.

Click here for the full review in The Jerusalem Post

Muza Bahar. (photo credit:PR)

Muza Bahar. (photo credit:PR)

FODMAP friendly score 7/10, Foodie score 9/10

Discovering hidden treasures in Downtown Haifa

I had the honor to be invited on a food tour of Downtown Haifa (The Lower City) by Jessica Halfin, CEO of Haifa Street Food Tours and ambassador of #TheNewHaifa.  Jessica invited a group of 20 journalists, food bloggers and others related to the industry to visit a selection of Haifa’s restaurants and bars to showcase the growing foodie culture in the city. Most of us were not familiar with the Haifa restaurant scene and we were pleasantly surprised at what we discovered.

Whipped Cream of Onion Soup, Hanamal 24 -Photo Credit: Avi Shumacher

Whipped Cream of Onion Soup, Hanamal 24 -Photo Credit: Avi Shumacher

As in many cities around the world, the area surrounding the port of Haifa used to be very industrial but in the past few years it has been renovated and it is now full of bars, cafes and restaurants.  We started the tour at Hanamal 24, one of the first restaurants to open when there was nothing else in the area.  We were hosted by Guy Avital, one of the restaurant owners, who along with his business partner chef Ran Rosh, previously owned Recital Danya for 13 years until the building they were in was sold.  Like many Israeli chefs, Rosh trained in France for many years and at one time owned a Michelin star restaurant near Paris, before moving back to Israel.  The menu is very much a traditional French bistro but the design of the restaurant itself is more rural and although it holds a total of 80 people, the dining area is spread out across a number of small rooms so there is a very intimate feel to the space.

White chocolate liver pate - Hanamal24

White chocolate liver pate – Hanamal24

We sampled the Whipped Cream of Onion Soup (NIS 38) which was rich and creamy and unlike any other onion soup (according to a trusted source, they made me a delicious Jerusalem artichoke soup instead).  Next we were presented with a beautifully plated dish with white chocolate, liver pate and chili – at first it was unclear if it was a starter or a dessert but we all agreed it was decadent and delicious.  It was confirmed that it was a starter and my favorite part of the dish was the perfect tiny chili flavored macaron with just the right amount of warmth.

Our next stop was directly across the street to newly opened Morel Worldwide Tapas and Wine.  Unlike a typical Spanish tapas bar, as the name suggests the dishes are f

Reggiano Eggplant - Morel Tapas

Reggiano Eggplant – Morel Tapas

rom all over world and to cater to Israeli palettes they are medium size sharing dishes rather than the small tapas you find in Spain.  The restaurant itself is bright and airy and has a European bistro feel to it.  We sampled the Tuna Tartar (NIS 39) mini tacos which were tasty but lacked punch and the Reggiano Eggplant which was deliciously rich and comforting.

Lastly the Carpaccio Sinta (NIS 42) was tasty if not slightly predictable.   The chef/owner at Morel was an incredibly friendly generous host and it was clear that his goal is deliver what his customers want.  Morel prides themselves on their vast selection of affordable wine, including several local Israeli wines that are only NIS 20 a glass.

We were fortunate to taste some great wines from Vortman’s Winery and the owner Hai Vortman spoke to us about his critically acclaimed wines.  The Fume Blanc 2015 from the nearby Shfeya Valley is 100% Sauvignon Blanc and was a surprising delight as I don’t normally favor white wines.  It was much fruitier than European Sauvignon Blanc wines, while still being a dry wine. Hai explained that an increasing number of wineries are growing grapes in this area as it produces flavors that differ from the Golan and the Galil.

Down the same street is Chang Ba, a wonderfully authentic Thai street food restaurant. The chef who originates from the party island of Koh Phangan serves his favorite Thai street food dishes at a slightly elevated level.  Some of the Thai herbs that are the base of these dishes are hard to find in Israel but chef Dam simply grows his own.  He did say that some vary slightly in taste due to the difference in climates between Israel and Thailand but he manages to get pretty close to the real deal.

Chang Ba - Photo Credit: Avi Shumacher

Chang Ba – Photo Credit: Avi Shumacher

Chang Ba started in a smaller location with space for just 20 people and recently moved to Rehov Hanamal to bigger premises in the heart of the action.  We started with a deliciously spicy Som Tum (NIS 36) – green papaya salad and we were then presented with bowl of white rice and a buffet of all their most popular dishes.  My clear favorite was the Pla Thot (NIS 94), a whole sea bass which was lightly fried and served with a spicy thai herb sauce.  The green curry was also delicious and the most of the dishes on the menu have the option of tofu, chicken, beef, shrimps or fish so there really is something for everyone.

Our final stop was the Libira BrewPub which serves a selection of dishes that pair well with their own brand craft beers.  There were a number of pork based dishes on offer which I declined to taste like sausages with sauerkraut and a meatloaf, as well as some salads and fresh breads.

Gal's Bakery - Photo Credit: Avi Shumacher

Gal’s Bakery – Photo Credit: Avi Shumacher

The highlight of the night for many of us was a delivery of pastries from Gal Gavrieli of Gal’s Bakery.  At one time Gal’s creations were available up and down the countrGal’s Bakery – Photo Credit: Avi Shuy but now they can only be found at his bakery and café in Merkaz Hacarmel and for delivery within Haifa.  Gal brought us a selection of both his savory and sweet pastries which were all incredibly buttery, flaky and addictive!

Jessica did a great job showcasing the Haifa culinary scene and we have already discussed a return visit to enjoy full meals at Hanamal 24 and Chang Ba and to visit Gal’s Bakery to try more of his incredible delicacies and eat in the café.

Haifa has many boutique hotels to choose from, here is a full list and if you are looking for five star accommodation then it has to be Dan Carmel.

Getting Steamy in the Shuk

UPDATE: March 2017 – Steam is currently closed until further notice.

Over the last few months, new eateries have popped up in and around the Jerusalem shuk, so it is sometimes hard to keep a track of them all. One of these new places is Steam Kitchen and Bar, owned by a young US oleh, Chananya Rosenthal.  As a lover of fast food, Chananya has planned to open a place in the shuk for some time and was lucky when a small shop became available on Rehov Haegoz (up from Fishnchips and opposite Shuka Bar).  This strip is particularly busy at night when the fresh food stalls close and the bars and restaurants take over.

According to the Steam Facebook page, they serve steamed buns filled with classic American sandwiches but Chananya recently decided to change to classic Israeli fillings for his steamed buns.  I’ll be honest, I was disappointed as I was looking forward to a Reuben, kosher BLT and quails eggs that others had raved about.

For now the menu is very limited, soup of the day to start, shawarma or pargit steam bun sandwiches (NIS 27) or schnitzel salad (NIS 30) with steam bun croutons. Steam’s selling point is that all the ingredients in their sandwiches are high quality and homemade – which I am in favor of, but I didn’t taste enough of a difference to make me want to come back to Steam, rather than going to my favorite local shuk guy across the street to get a huge laffa for around the same price.  There is no doubt that the quality of the steam buns served are great.  The dough is made fresh every day and they steam the buns to order, but in my opinion, they need to create a menu that differentiates themselves more clearly from that which is on offer around them, in order to attract customers who have so many delicious places to choose from.

Now let’s talk cocktails, because to me, that is Steam’s USP (Unique Selling Point) and something which will have me going back for more.  The popularity of cocktails is growing at a rapid pace in Israel, with new cocktail bars opening up all over the place and restaurants have also caught onto the trend and are improving their cocktail menus. However, until recently, you couldn’t get real cocktails in the shuk itself – well you can now!  The Steam cocktail menu features 10 fairly classic cocktails, all for NIS 37, and lovingly prepared using high quality ingredients.  The simple Gin and Tonic uses Bombay Sapphire gin with Fever Tree tonic – a must for any true G&T lover but very rare to find in the shuk, let alone most restaurants in Jerusalem.  The Bourbon Lager with Jack Daniels, Drambuie, lemon juice and lager is a great cocktail for anyone averse to sweet drinks. The Sweet Arak is a delicious mix of arak, lemon juice, dry martini and mango syrup but what makes the drink are the caramelized lemon wedge and burnt star anise served on-top.  I found it a tad too sweet but I will definitely try it again and request less mango syrup.  They also have a selection of beers from Moscow Microbrewery near Bet Shemesh.  The best news is that Steam run a happy hour from 3-7pm with buy one get one free on cocktails per person.

Steam is still in the development stages and I really hope that they manage to find their niche in an increasingly competitive market but one thing is for sure, Chananya has a real passion for what he does and his aim is to serve Jerusalemites with food that they enjoy and makes them happy.

He is open for both lunch and dinner and although there is currently no hechsher, he is planning to get Hashgacha Pratit.

FODMAP friendly score 2/10, Foodie score 6/10.

Opening up Jerusalem

At the end of November Open Restaurants held their inaugural Jerusalem festival with four days of culinary events including workshops, tours, talks and other food related activities for children and adults.  Some of the highlights included a dessert workshop with the pastry chef of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, tours of the Israel Museum by some of Jerusalem’s leading chefs and a cocktail party on the Light Rail.

The festival was an exciting addition to the Jerusalem calendar and although initially there was limited information available in English, the website was updated a few weeks before the festival with details of all activities which can still be found here http://open-restaurants.co.il/?lang=en.

I was fortunate to meet the force behind this project, Merav Oren, a serial entrepreneur with a background in the high-tech industry. She founded Open Restaurants in Tel Aviv in 2013 and plans to expand the model in Europe in Amsterdam and then London.  I spoke with her towards the end of the festival and she was uplifted by the energy and excitement in Jerusalem and is looking forward to planning next year’s event.  She assured me that next year they will aim to have the English website available well in advance so that English speakers in Jerusalem can access all the information.

Photos from the events can be found on their new English Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/openrestaurantsglobal.

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Red Tie Cocktail (Tomer Foltyn Photography)

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Alliance House Mad Tea Party (Tomer Foltyn Photography)